4 Mar 2020

Applications open for Judith Neilson Institute Freelance Grant for Asian Journalism

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Applications are now open for the Judith Neilson Institute Freelance Grant for Asian Journalism, one of three grants the Walkley Foundation is offering in 2020 to fund public interest journalism.

What happens in Asia shapes what happens in the rest of the world and few countries are as closely tied to Asia as Australia.

Yet media coverage of Asia does not always keep pace with its importance.

Established by the Walkley Foundation, the Judith Neilson Institute Grant for Asian Journalism aims to encourage more and better reporting on Asia by Australian journalists.

Up to $25,000 will be awarded to help Australian freelance journalists produce a significant body of work in any medium.

Applications are open from March 2, 2020 and close on April 26, 2020.

Find out more about the grant and how to apply.

More stories making an impact

Last year, the Walkley Grants for Freelance Journalism funded 11 public interest journalism projects.

The initial pool of $50,000 from the Walkley Public Fund for Journalism was boosted by an additional $25,000 contribution from the Judith Neilson Institute.

You can read the grant recipients' stories in the Walkley Magazine.

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